I am currently working with a client who plans to make $2 million of bequests to his favorite charities upon his death. His estate will receive an estate tax deduction for these bequests; however his estate will not receive an income tax deduction for these bequests.

I told him about a different method for making the payments that will require the cooperation of his wife. The plan works as follows:

1. His Will makes a $2 million cash bequest to his wife.
2. The Will makes a non-binding request for his wife to consider making gifts to his favorite charities.
3. After my client dies, his wife will receive $2 million and will make charitable gifts of $2 million.

The revised plan will have the following tax consequences: My client’s estate will receive a $2 million marital deduction for estate tax purposes. This replaces the $2 million charitable estate tax deduction that he would have otherwise received. His wife will get a $2 million income tax deduction. Since his wife will be in the highest income tax bracket (currently 35%), she will save $700,000 on her income taxes. Her income will not be large enough to receive the entire deduction in the first year. Rather, it will take about four years. Nevertheless, she will receive substantial income tax savings that would not have been realized if her husband had given the money directly to charity.

The risk for my client is that his wife will not make the charitable gifts. Legally, she can keep the money. My client trusts his wife to honor his wishes, especially since his wife likes most of his favorite charities.